Sourdough starter discards, The Sourdough Journals
Leave a Comment

English muffins, third batch

Time to perfect these English muffins! Last night, around 9:30, I set the sponge to rising. I’m keen to get a good, tender English muffin this round, one that is not burnt on the outside, and is fully baked but moist on the inside.

This morning, the poolish has doubled but looks a little strange on top. When I stir it down, though, it’s fluffy beneath the surface.

The poolish has risen overnight and looks a little weird on the surface

The poolish has risen overnight and looks a little weird on the surface

I wonder if that strangeness has anything to do with the sourdough discards I used as starter for this batch.

If you’ve followed along from the git-go, you know that, while I was cultivating the starter, I saved all the discards–those big gobs of excess starter the recipe said to throw out each day. I couldn’t bear the thought of trashing all that good, fermented flour, so I saved it, fed it a bit each day to keep at least some of the organisms alive, and used it in pancakes, biscuits, banana nut muffins, a positively scrumptious apple cinnamon coffee cake and English muffins like these I’m baking today.

Last night, I used just one-half cup of that excess starter to get my sponge going. The  discards looked okay–quite a bit of hooch, but lots of bubbly action. A whiff was all I needed to know it was plenty sour, but hey, that could make the muffins better, right?

So even if the sponge does look a little weird, I’ll give it a go this morning. Following the recipe, I mix the ingredients in the stand mixer, using the paddle. We like cinnamon raisin muffins, so I add a teaspoon of cinnamon and three-quarter cup raisins to the mixture, forgetting that I should hold the raisins and knead them in just before turning the dough out to shape and cut into rounds.

The mixture combines okay, but when I switch to the dough hook, the going gets tough. The raisins keep the dough from stretching and forming a ball. It takes about ten minutes to reach the stage where the dough pulls from the sides of the bowl, and several more before it begins to look smooth enough to turn onto a floured board and roll for cutting.

After hand kneading on a floured board, I roll the dough out to about half an inch thick

After hand kneading on a floured board, I roll the dough out to about half an inch thick

During kneading, I added a full one-third cup flour, a tablespoon at a time. Still, the dough is sticky and difficult to handle. My muffins turn out a little funky looking.

The dough is sticky, but makes relatively round muffin shapes

The dough is sticky, but makes relatively round muffin shapes

Covering them with a towel, I set the tray in the oven to proof. The light is on for added warmth. My two-year-old granddaughter is over, helping me bake, and together we check the muffins every hour. They take a long time to rise.

Four hours in, they’ve puffed a little, but not much. Time to bake! When I hand them onto my heated (medium-low) griddle, they feel light and fluffy.

After more than four hours, the muffins are just slightly puffy

We love the taste of these muffins. This recipe is a keeper, but I need to find the sweet spot for baking them on the stove-top griddle so they’re fully cooked on the inside–moist and tender–and not scorched on the outside.

Not this time. I bake a few slowly, over medium-low heat and still they burn. I turn the flames down under my griddle and try again, but the next group is mostly scorched by the time the insides bake.

This time, I baked the muffins on a low setting, but some of them still burned on the outside before the insides were done

This time, I baked the muffins on a low setting, but some of them still burned on the outside before the insides were done

The two-year-old, a bread lover like her granny, keeps asking, “When will they be done, YayYay?” Finally we fork one open, steaming hot, but done inside, and slather it with butter. Calories? Whose counting. We’ve waited all day for this..

The crumb is even, not as pocked with air bubble holes as we would like

The crumb is even, not as pocked with air bubble holes as we would like

I’m disappointed with the crumb. I was hoping for lots of big airy holes, after all that slow rising. Even more disappointing? The taste! These muffins are so bitter neither of us can finish our half.

The little one trots off to the living room to play with her dolls. I toss the failed muffins in the compost bucket, along with an almost-full, quart jar of starter discards. Blech! Done with that.

The good news? Next time I make these muffins, I get to use bona fide starter, not this excess I nursed along with bits of flour and water. That may be my big mistake. I probably encouraged all kinds of bacteria to grow but not the yeast. Lesson learned.

I'd love to hear from you!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s